Empowering and Inspiring Women All Over The World Through Afflatus Hijab Fashion Line

How fashion can speak louder than words

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Afflatus Hijab is a brand owned by an Edmonton fashion designer known as Wedad Amiri. This Canadian bound Muslim woman started Afflatus Hijab with zero experience on fashion. She actually studied sociology and political science and had worked for the city of St. Albert for almost 6 and a half years, giving out presentations to adolescence in classrooms.

Photo of Wedad Amiri

What triggered her to establish her own fashion line was because of the gap in the market. It was always a problem finding the appropriate attire especially for special occasions like weddings, gatherings and engagements. She said in VueWeekly, “There was nothing that I could find that was fancy enough, but covered enough“. She decided to take action and started aiming to make attires that could be modest and actually looked good without having any alterations made to the clothes.

Image from: CBC

The name Afflatus actually means, “a sudden divine rush of inspiration”, which was exactly how Wedad Amiri felt while creating the company. On top of that, she wants her company to have a certain stand, in which she has been highlighting on how Muslim and Indigenous women can be successful and aim to de-stigmatize mental illness in nowadays community.

How exactly does she do that? She focuses on empowering the Muslim women, by naming each of her pieces after inspirational women. She would write about the successful women to give hope and raise awareness to all women so that they may be inspired with the positive representations.

Image from: Afflatus Hijab website

Conforming to her aim in empowering the woman, she also named her line with indigenous women. She felt that Indigenous women also undergo almost similar stereotypes with the Muslim women. Below is the image of the piece called, Maureen Callihoo Ligtvoet. The piece is named after an indigenous woman who is active in contributing to the Edmonton community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image from: Afflatus Hijab website

Recently, she also did the same thing but with women who had experienced and still have the mental health problem. This piece is named after Marwah Boroot, who is 28 years old and a other of 2. She has been diagnosed with severe clinical depression. In the website, it shares about what triggered her illness, the hurdles and obstacles that she had to face and also some advices.

Image from: Afflatus Hijab website

Each and every piece has its own story. If we just take the time to actually look around, not many of those who are struggling with negative thoughts and mental illness are willing to open up. Some fear they would be judged and labeled as not having strong faith in Allah and the list goes one. That is what Amiri wants to strongly promote. To encourage those who are struggling to be able talk about it comfortably. To make them feel okay to share stories about their struggle and to let them know it is okay to feel that way. Although it may not instantly solve their problem, it could be helping them in a way that we will never know. Some people find that they feel less burdened when they talk about their problems and struggles.

via GIPHY

We can learn a lot through Wedad Amiri’s story and brand. She is a woman with a vision and is very inspiring in a sense that she took a leap of faith in achieving her dream. Although she doesn’t have any experience in fashion, her strong mindset had driven her to develop her amazing skillsets. Additionally, we could also learn to be brave in stating our stand and fighting for it. She approaches the issue of mental illness in a unique way, knowing how taboo the topic is to some communities, even the Muslim.

Through the stories that are shared with each piece, people could really get inspired and become motivated to keep living their life. Who knew that maybe the stories would give even the slightest hope to those who are struggling.

 

 

Content from: Muslims of Alberta, Afflatus Hijab, VueWeekly, CBC

 

By Mirarhyme

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